50 Perfect Witchy Names for Cats

Cat wearing witch hat costume

Getty Images/Lubov Klepikovskaya / EyeEm

When you think of witches, cats come to mind as often as broomsticks and pointy black hats. Of all cats, black cats in particular give off the spookiest witchy vibes. Historically speaking, back when people believed witches to be real, cats were a witch’s favorite animal companion (others preferred animal companions including dogs, toads, and mice). 

Witch animal companions, known as “familiars,” were believed to possess magical abilities that let them carry out a witch’s bidding. This may have led to the idea that cats were bad luck. Hundreds of years ago, cats were so closely tied to witches that simply owning a cat was cause for an investigation, and cats were frequently burned at the stake with those unlucky enough to be convicted of practicing witchcraft.

With their sleek, stealth movement and watchful, aloof demeanor, it’s easy to see how cats became associated with witches and evil doing. Cats are still strongly tied to Halloween and other pagan celebrations. Today, making a connection between witchcraft and cats is just for fun. Now that you know why witch-themed names are purrfect for cats, let’s take a look at our favorite witchy names for cats.

Tips for Choosing Witchy Cat Names

When brainstorming for a great witch-themed name for your cat or kitten, also consider your new kitty’s size, color, coat type and personality. Some witch names will be well-suited for black cats or female cats, but you can draw inspiration from anything about your unique cat

To get you going, check out our list of 50 perfect witchy cat names to help you get started. Whether you find your new cat or kitten’s name on this list, or just have fun browsing different witch names, you’re certain to land on a great witch-themed cat name for your new friend. First, let’s take a look at some of our very favorite witchy cat names from all categories.

Top Witchy Cat Names

  • Bellatrix 
  • Crookshanks 
  • Hex
  • Hocus Pocus
  • Jinx
  • Magic
  • Maleficent
  • Melisandre
  • Midnight
  • Phantom
  • Salem 
  • Seer
  • Raven

More Witchy Cat Name Ideas

Here is a collection of witch-themed cat names, sorted by category, including cat names inspired by traditional witch lore, pop culture and color. Peruse these name ideas as you work your magic to find the perfect witchy cat name:

Classic Witchy Cat Names 

Some witch-themed cat names harken back to very ancient times when cats and witches went hand in hand. Consider some of these timeless witchy cat names:

  • Abracadabra
  • Charm 
  • Coven
  • Crow
  • Hex
  • Hocus Pocus
  • Jinx
  • Medusa
  • Merlin
  • Rune
  • Seer
  • Shadow
  • Solstice
  • Spirit
  • Taboo
  • Tarot
  • Thirteen 
  • Trance
  • Wicca
  • Wiccan
  • Wizard

Witchy Cat Names from Pop Culture

Books, television and movies are always great inspiration for witch-themed cat names. Cats and witches feature prominently in the Harry Potter book and movie series, which is after all based on a world of witchcraft and wizardry. The 90s television show Sabrina, the Teenage Witch, stars not only witches, but a charmingly sarcastic black cat named Salem. Another TV show launched in the 90s, Charmed, follows a family of sisters who discover they are witches. And countless Disney movies feature delightfully evil witches, from Sleeping Beauty to The Little Mermaid. Here, draw on some excellent witchy cat names pulled from pop culture.

  • Bellatrix: Bellatrix Lestrange, a powerful evil witch in the Harry Potter series
  • Crookshanks: Hermoine the witch’s orange pet cat in the Harry Potter series
  • Dolores: The hated Dolores Umbridge from the Harry Potter series, a witch who is obsessed with cats and whose patronus is a cat
  • Elsa: Snow queen and good witch of Disney’s Frozen films
  • Fleur: Fleur Delacour, a young French witch from the Harry Potter series 
  • Hermione: Gifted witch and bookworm Hermione Granger in the Harry Potter series; Harry and Ron’s best friend
  • Luna: Luna Lovegood from the Harry Potter series, Harry’s charming and quirky witch friend
  • Maleficent: Evil witch queen in Disney’s Sleeping Beauty and self-proclaimed “Mistress of All Evil” 
  • Melisandre: A witch from the Game of Thrones series, also known as the “red woman” 
  • Minerva: Beloved Professor Minerva McGonagall in the Harry Potter series, a witch who can turn into a cat
  • Narcissa: Narcissa Malfoy, Draco Malfoy’s witch mother in the Harry Potter series 
  • Paige: One of four witch sisters in the television show Charmed
  • Phoebe: One of four witch sisters in the television show Charmed
  • Piper: One of four witch sisters in the television show Charmed
  • Prue: One of four witch sisters in the television show Charmed
  • Rowena: Rowena Ravenclaw from the Harry Potter series, a witch who was one of the four founders of Hogwarts (Ravenclaw House is named for her)
  • Sabrina: Title character in Sabrina, the Teenage Witch
  • Tonks: Nymphadora Tonks, a witch in the Harry Potter series; Harry’s trusted friend 

Witchy Cat Names for Black Cats 

Black cats are especially spooky and deserving of a witchy name. Although black cats have long been considered bad luck, any cat lover knows that black cats are among the most beautiful and mysterious of cats. Consider some of these witch-themed names that are perfect for black beauties:  

  • Black Magic
  • Crow
  • Magic 
  • Midnight
  • Phantom
  • Raven
  • Salem: The title character’s black cat in the television show Sabrina, the Teenage Witch
  • Shadow
  • Thirteen 
  • Twilight
  • Ursula: Villainous sea witch in Disney’s The Little Mermaid

For more cat name ideas, check out:

Article Sources
The Spruce Pets uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.
  1. Ezra, Elizabeth. Becoming Familiar: Witches and Companion Animals in Harry Potter and His Dark Materials. Children's Literature, vol. 47, p. 175-196, 2019, Johns Hopkins University Press. doi:10.1353/chl.2019.0009